A separate thought...

You can never get a cup of tea large enough or a book long enough to suit me.
― C.S. Lewis
thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.
If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.
The UN unanimously approved a 12,000-strong UN peacekeeping force in the Central African Republic.
It’s now been 20 years since the genocide in Rwanda — here, Tutsi survivors pose with Hutus who victimized them, and with whom they’ve since reconciled.
Colum Lynch reports a three-part series on the UN peacekeeping failure in Darfur: 1, 2, 3.
Doctors Without Borders accused the UN of ignoring horrible living conditions of 21,000 South Sudanese using part of the peacekeeping base in Juba as a refugee camp.
Clashes in Nigeria between Fulani cattle rustlers and Hausa vigilantes left 72 dead last Monday.
Two anti-piracy consultants for the UN were shot and killed in Galkayo, Somalia.  
Abdel-Rahman Shaheen is the latest Al Jazeera journalist to be arrested in Egypt. 
Infighting among Islamic rebel groups in Syria leaves 51 dead.
Drought looms in Syria.
American anti-tank weaponry shows up in Syrian rebel hands.
Dutch Jesuit priest Frans van der Lugt, who refused to evacuate Syria, where he lived for decades, was assassinated by a gunman outside his home in Homs. 
Netanyahu ordered his cabinet to cut communications with their Palestinian counterparts after Palestine requested to sign on to 15 international conventions. 
Iran’s Revolutionary Guard say they have captured a number of foreign agents entering from Iraq with intentions to carry out bombings and assassinations. 
Iran named Hamid Aboutalebi as its UN envoy — a provocative choice because Aboutalebi was a member of the student group who held Americans hostage in 1979 (although he was not himself directly involved in the event).
As last weekend’s votes in Afghanistan continue to be tallied, Ashraf Ghani and Abdullah Abdullah appear to be competing for the lead. A record number — 7 million people — turned out to vote. 
The Afghan government has begun an investigation into why a security officer, now in custody, killed AP photographer Anja Niedringhaus and wounded reporter Kathy Gannon.
A bomb on a stationary train in western Pakistan killed 14 on Tuesday.
22 were killed in a blast in Islamabad on Wednesday.
Pakistan plans to release 13 Taliban prisoners as part of peace negotiations. 
A new art project in Pakistan gives a face to civilian drone strike victims.
The Pakistani Taliban launched a website (link is to a news report, not to the actual website).
A Marine shot and killed another Marine at Camp Lejeune on Tuesday afternoon at the base’s main gate. 
Mexican self-defense groups refuse to disarm.
Pro-Russian violence leaks into Eastern Ukraine. 
An infographic on Eastern Ukrainian separatist movements.
The Washington Post on the special relationship between special operations and the FBI. 
Britain is increasing exercising its power to strip citizenship from suspected terrorists without prior court involvement — and then, of course, some of them end up getting killed in drone strikes.
The US is three years behind in the reports it is by law supposed to issue on potential sanctions violators. 
FBI investigation shows that Russia failed to provide some critical intelligence to the US about Tamerlan Tsarnaev.
Lawyers for Guantánamo prisoner Shaker Aamer are seeking his release on the grounds of failing health.
Alan Gross, the US contractor imprisoned in Cuba for the past four years, has gone on hunger strike.
According to further Snowden leaks, the US spied on groups like Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International (not particularly surprising, given historical record here).
Popular Mechanics rounds up a couple of military escalations you haven’t been hearing about. 
Roughly 5% ($500m) of the US defense budget will be spent developing electronic warfare systems. 
A Microsoft researcher makes the case that increased use of encryption inside intelligence agencies could rein in surveillance.
What you need to know about Heartbleed.
Hayden, the former CIA director, gets a bit sexist in his/the agency’s feud with Sen. Feinstein. 
A really awesome new invention for plugging battlefield wounds extra effectively gets FDA approval.
The Secret Service implements some internal clean-up efforts. 
Any NYC veterans reading the round-up: here are some events for free legal assistance at the end of April/beginning of May.
Some of things you shouldn’t say to returning veterans — and some of the things you should. 
Alex Horton eloquently rejects the post-traumatic stress narrative in the second Fort Hood shooting.
Photo: Zawa, Central African Republic. Anti-balaka military patrol. Goran Tomasevic/Reuters.

thepoliticalnotebook:


This Week in War
. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Photo: Zawa, Central African Republic. Anti-balaka military patrol. Goran Tomasevic/Reuters.

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.
If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.
Egyptian General Abdul-Fatah al-Sisi, leader of last year’s military takeover, has announced his military resignation and presidential bid.
The leader of the Muslim Brotherhood and 682 others went on trial on a variety of charges, a day after the capital sentencing of 500 plus supporters of former president Morsi.
The Ethiopian government is importing European and Chinese technologies to spy on the electronic communications of the opposition.
William Langewiesche reports for GQ from South Sudan, where he observed G4S (a British “global security” contractor) and their ordnance-disposal teams in action.
A makeshift refugee camp near the airport in the Central African capital of Bangui holds tens of thousands of people in an incredibly precarious situation.
Peacekeepers in CAR have declared war against the anti-balaka, a Christian militant group, after the group’s attacks against their troops.
More than three million Nigerians, a third of the country’s population, are suffering the results of the Islamic militant uprising.
The US is sending 150 USAF Special Operations forces and CV-22 Osprey aircraft to assist the Ugandan government in its efforts against Joseph Kony.
The Arab League summit was held this week despite deep tensions over Syria and Egypt.
Turkey blocked Twitter ahead of an electoral vote.
53.6% of Syria’s chemical weapons have been destroyed or removed. 
Turkey shot down a Syrian warplane.
Islamist rebels in Syria captured a small town on the Turkish border.
Syrian troops overtook the Crusader castle on the Lebanese border, a UNESCO world heritage site with symbolic value to the rebels who had controlled it since 2012.
20 members of Yemen’s security forces were killed in a militant raid on a checkpoint. 
The entire board of Iraq’s electoral commission resigned this week, citing political interference. 
RFE/RL’s Baghdad bureau chief, Mohammed Bdaiwai Owaid Al-Shammari, was shot dead by a member of the presidential guard. 
Reporters Without Borders expresses concern about Iraq’s official treatment of journalists.
A global spike in executions is sourced to those carried out in Iran and Iraq.
Iran says one of its five border guards held hostage by a militant group has been killed. 
Well-known Afghan journalist Sardar Ahmed, his wife and two of his three young children were among those killed by a militant gunman at the Serena Hotel last week.
The chief judge in former Pakistani leader Pervez Musharraf’s treason trial has quit, recusing himself after repeated accusations of bias against Musharraf. 
Peace talks began between the Pakistani government and the Pakistani Taliban.
A mass grave has been discovered in Bosnia, containing the remains of 147 Bosnian Muslims, believed to have been killed in 1992 in the town of Kozarac. 
Yulia Tymoshenko, Ukraine’s former prime minister, has announced a bid for the presidency.
Russia is re-investing in Afghanistan as the US pulls out. 
Russia calls on its prominent artists to publicly express support for the Crimean annexation, a move that many artists reject as a return to Soviet-era tactics. 
Increased signs of the annexation in Crimean daily life: the currency is now the ruble, and the Russian Investigative Committee has set up its new offices and legal procedures are in limbo.
Russia staged military training exercises in the separatist Moldovan region of Trans-Dniester, considered a possible next target for annexation.
CNN reports that a new US intelligence assessment believes that Russian incursion into eastern Ukraine is more likely than previously thought. 
According to Time, Putin’s aversion to texting presents a challenge to US spies. 
Japan is turning over more than 700 pounds of weapons-grade plutonium and 450 pounds of highly-enriched uranium to the US.
The death toll in Venezuelan protests rose to 34.
Tens of thousands of Chileans marched for constitutional reform.
On the rise and fall of unusual Army Special Forces Major Jim Gant. 
How British satellite company Inmarsat narrowed the search for flight MH370.
The White House prepares NSA reforms, which Shane Harris points out still contains wins for current NSA practices. 
Abu Ghaith, bin Laden’s son-in-law, was convicted of terrorism charges by a federal jury in New York City.
Photo: Raqqa province, Syria. An image from a militant website shows a group of fighters with the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), which has become entrenched in the province. Associated Press.

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Photo: Raqqa province, Syria. An image from a militant website shows a group of fighters with the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), which has become entrenched in the province. Associated Press.

globalvoices:

When Pharell Williams released his “Happy” single followed by the stunningly beautiful “24 hours of Happy“, who could have expected it to have influenced hundreds of covers from virtually all corners of the world? Well, people in the Middle East and North Africa were no exception.
The “Happy” Videos of Middle East and North Africa

globalvoices:

When Pharell Williams released his “Happy” single followed by the stunningly beautiful “24 hours of Happy“, who could have expected it to have influenced hundreds of covers from virtually all corners of the world? Well, people in the Middle East and North Africa were no exception.

The “Happy” Videos of Middle East and North Africa

(via pol102)

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.
If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.
The US increases focus on training and advising African troops.
Ethiopian and Somali forces took the town of Rabhdure, handing al-Shabab its first defeat since September. 
The state of emergency was lifted in Tunisia after three years. 
Niger extradited Muammar Gaddhafi’s son Saadi to Libya. 
Twenty journalists, mostly from Al Jazeera, continue their trial in Egypt for helping the Muslim Brotherhood and attacking Egypt’s overseas reputation.
Spanish journalist Marc Marginedas has returned home after spending six months in captivity in Syria. 
The passage between east and west (opposition-controlled and government-controlled) Aleppo has become the Corridor of Death, an alley where government snipers target children and pregnant women for sport. 
The weirdest story in this round-up: a video has surfaced showing two Los Angeles gang members claiming to be fighting on Syria’s frontlines alongside Assad’s forces. The authenticity of the video is definitely not verified.
Israel seized an Iranian shipment of weapons to Gaza. 
The US is restricting the movement of Syria’s UN envoy to a 25-mile radius from New York City, similar to rules applied to Iranian and North Korean envoys.
Sergei Ponamarev, a freelance photojournalist on assignment in the Ukraine for the New York Times, talks about what he’s seeing in Crimea. 
Moldova worries that Russian intervention won’t be limited to Crimea. 
Crimea’s pro-Russian parliament has approved a referendum to vote on whether to secede from Ukraine and become part of the Russian Federation. 
Situation maps from the Washington Post on the Russian incursion into Crimea. 
How the situation in the Ukraine might complicate Afghanistan. 
Bombings in markets in central Iraq and clashes in Fallujah killed 42 on Thursday.
Student human rights activist Maryam Shafipour has been sentenced to seven years in prison in Iran for “spreading propaganda” and “colluding” against the ruling system.
13,729 members of the Afghan security forces have been killed in the past 13 years, far more than previously estimated. At least 2,176 American troops have died in Afghanistan. 
The Afghan National Army and security forces face a difficult IED problem as US forces leave. 
A NATO airstrike Thursday killed five ANA soldiers. 
The New York Times hosted a Room for Debate discussion on countering terrorism after the withdrawal.
The Taliban organized a prison break from Sarposa prison using a forged letter. 
The Washington Post interviews Karzai.
Gunmen and suicide bombers attack in the heart of Islamabad, killing 11. 
Taliban peace talks resume. 
The Afghan Public Protection Force, which guards US convoys and international aid programs, has been disbanded. 
India is the world’s biggest arms importer, but wants to increase its own production of weapons. 
Two are dead in clashes in Venezuela after motorcyclists attempted to remove a protester barricade. 
The Senate rejected a proposal to take power away from military commanders in the handling of whether or not sexual assault cases are prosecuted. 
The Army’s top sexual assault prosecutor has been suspended after a lawyer working for him accused him of… yes, sexual assault at a sexual assault conference. 
Photo: Kandahar, Afghanistan. On patrol to search caves for weapons caches. Scott Olson/Getty. 

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Photo: Kandahar, Afghanistan. On patrol to search caves for weapons caches. Scott Olson/Getty. 

azmatzahra:

When the Egyptian revolution broke out in 2011, millions around the world turned to Al Jazeera for its reporters’ smart, in-depth, around-the-clock coverage. Three years later, not one single Al Jazeera journalist is reporting on the ground in Egypt. Instead, four of the media network’s journalists are being detained by Egyptian authorities. The mounting worldwide campaign for their release is based on a simple message: Journalism isn’t a crime. Along with thousands of others, we’re asking Egypt not to suppress freedom of the press. Will you do the same? #FreeAJStaff

azmatzahra:

When the Egyptian revolution broke out in 2011, millions around the world turned to Al Jazeera for its reporters’ smart, in-depth, around-the-clock coverage. Three years later, not one single Al Jazeera journalist is reporting on the ground in Egypt. Instead, four of the media network’s journalists are being detained by Egyptian authorities. The mounting worldwide campaign for their release is based on a simple message: Journalism isn’t a crime. Along with thousands of others, we’re asking Egypt not to suppress freedom of the press. Will you do the same? #FreeAJStaff

(via thepoliticalnotebook)