A separate thought...

Politics, Feminism, quotes, books, films, tv shows, music and some ramblings.
womenrockscience:

Congratulations to both of them. At aged 17 Malala is the youngest Nobel Prize winner ever.

Congratulations! Well deserved.

womenrockscience:

Congratulations to both of them. At aged 17 Malala is the youngest Nobel Prize winner ever.

Congratulations! Well deserved.

(via femininefreak)

internationalwomensinitiative:

Media representations of gender alter societies views of reality. Some students from the University of Saskatchewan have put together a rather compelling clip to illustrate why we should be working to change the way gender roles are dictated by the media.

thepoliticalnotebook:


This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.
An excellent piece of longform with accompanying photography in the Washington Post on life amidst a forgotten conflict in the Congo.
Photographer Phil Moore talks about covering the Congo for the past three years. 
A new video shows Boko Haram leader Abubakar Shekau alive and well (and flipping off the camera) despite the Nigerian government’s claims they killed him two weeks ago.
South Sudan’s government twice delays discussion on the security bill.
30 Libyan soldiers were killed in a double suicide bombing and clashes in Benghazi on Thursday.
Violence in Lebanon targets Syrian refugees.
Evaluating changing balances of power in Yemen.
The reconstruction plan in Gaza is drawing criticism for its restrictive monitoring of supplies, with detractors saying the plan puts the UN in charge of a continuing Israeli blockade.
The White House criticized Israeli settlement plans in east Jerusalem, saying it will “poison the atmosphere.”
Palestine drafts a UN resolution to end Israeli occupation.
The OPCW-UN mission to destroy chemical weapons in Syria has completed and will withdraw from the country.
ISIS beheaded ten people in the Kurdish region of Syria: a civilian, a handful of Kurdish fighters and Syrian Arab rebels.
The northern Syrian town of Kobane is under heavy fire, caught in fighting between ISIS and Kurdish forces.
Iraqi security has deteriorated in recent days, with an uptick in car bombs and mortar attacks, like the Baghdad car bomb Wednesday night that killed 14 and wounded 51.
According to UN figures, at least 1,119 Iraqis were killed as a result of acts of terrorism and violence in September (these numbers exclude Anbar province).
US bombing in Iraq is not being held to the “near-certainty” standard for avoiding civilian casualties.
In desperation, an Iraqi unit defending itself against ISIS in Anbar made as many calls as they could for assistance which never came, forcing them to flee.
ISIS uses wheat as a tool of control.
A third video of ISIS hostage John Cantlie has been released.
Is that VICE documentary on ISIS illegal?
The ISIS war machine and the limitations of leadership targeting.
Marines deployed a new 2300-strong quick reaction force in Kuwait.
A look at Qatar’s relationship with extremism
After Ashraf Ghani was sworn in as the new president  of Afghanistan, the US finally got its signed Bilateral Security Agreement, one that permits US troops to stay “until 2024 and beyond.” Here is the agreement in full.
Ghani also ordered a reopening of the Kabul Bank fraud investigation.
A suicide bombing killed three army officers in Kabul Thursday and two similar attacks killed eleven the day before.
Blurred lines between militants and military in Pakistan.
The bombing of a passenger bus in Peshawar in northwest Pakistan killed seven.
Tensions between Hong Kong protesters and the government deepen.
Militants in the Abu Sayyaf group in the Philippines threaten to behead one of two German captives if their demands go unmet.
Ukrainian rebels have renewed their offensive against the Donetsk airport.
A Swiss Red Cross employee was killed after shells hit the Red Cross offices in Donetsk.
A Ukrainian activist recounts his experience in captivity at the hands of pro-Russian separatists. 
The young survivors of the 2004 Beslan school hostage crisis move ahead with their lives, documented by photographer Oksana Yushko.
New inquests have been ordered into the deaths of two Belfast civilians shot by security forces in 1972.
AFP editors talk about the experience and process of sifting through graphic photographs from war zones. 
The September update on US drone strikes in Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia.
A federal judge denied the Department of Justice’s request to close the Guantánamo Bay force feeding hearings, a request she called “deeply troubling.”
VICE interviews Guantánamo’s new commander, Rear Adm. Kyle Cozad.
Terrorism charges against former Guantánamo inmate Moazzem Begg fell apart, resulting in a not guilty verdict and setting him free from Belmarsh prison.
Photo: Syrian Kurds on the border between Turkey and Syria just after mortars hit on both sides. Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty.

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.

  • An excellent piece of longform with accompanying photography in the Washington Post on life amidst a forgotten conflict in the Congo.
  • Photographer Phil Moore talks about covering the Congo for the past three years. 
  • A new video shows Boko Haram leader Abubakar Shekau alive and well (and flipping off the camera) despite the Nigerian government’s claims they killed him two weeks ago.
  • South Sudan’s government twice delays discussion on the security bill.
  • 30 Libyan soldiers were killed in a double suicide bombing and clashes in Benghazi on Thursday.
  • Violence in Lebanon targets Syrian refugees.
  • Evaluating changing balances of power in Yemen.
  • The reconstruction plan in Gaza is drawing criticism for its restrictive monitoring of supplies, with detractors saying the plan puts the UN in charge of a continuing Israeli blockade.
  • The White House criticized Israeli settlement plans in east Jerusalem, saying it will “poison the atmosphere.”
  • Palestine drafts a UN resolution to end Israeli occupation.
  • The OPCW-UN mission to destroy chemical weapons in Syria has completed and will withdraw from the country.
  • ISIS beheaded ten people in the Kurdish region of Syria: a civilian, a handful of Kurdish fighters and Syrian Arab rebels.
  • The northern Syrian town of Kobane is under heavy fire, caught in fighting between ISIS and Kurdish forces.
  • Iraqi security has deteriorated in recent days, with an uptick in car bombs and mortar attacks, like the Baghdad car bomb Wednesday night that killed 14 and wounded 51.
  • According to UN figures, at least 1,119 Iraqis were killed as a result of acts of terrorism and violence in September (these numbers exclude Anbar province).
  • US bombing in Iraq is not being held to the “near-certainty” standard for avoiding civilian casualties.
  • In desperation, an Iraqi unit defending itself against ISIS in Anbar made as many calls as they could for assistance which never came, forcing them to flee.
  • ISIS uses wheat as a tool of control.
  • A third video of ISIS hostage John Cantlie has been released.
  • Is that VICE documentary on ISIS illegal?
  • The ISIS war machine and the limitations of leadership targeting.
  • Marines deployed a new 2300-strong quick reaction force in Kuwait.
  • A look at Qatar’s relationship with extremism
  • After Ashraf Ghani was sworn in as the new president  of Afghanistan, the US finally got its signed Bilateral Security Agreement, one that permits US troops to stay “until 2024 and beyond.” Here is the agreement in full.
  • Ghani also ordered a reopening of the Kabul Bank fraud investigation.
  • A suicide bombing killed three army officers in Kabul Thursday and two similar attacks killed eleven the day before.
  • Blurred lines between militants and military in Pakistan.
  • The bombing of a passenger bus in Peshawar in northwest Pakistan killed seven.
  • Tensions between Hong Kong protesters and the government deepen.
  • Militants in the Abu Sayyaf group in the Philippines threaten to behead one of two German captives if their demands go unmet.
  • Ukrainian rebels have renewed their offensive against the Donetsk airport.
  • A Swiss Red Cross employee was killed after shells hit the Red Cross offices in Donetsk.
  • A Ukrainian activist recounts his experience in captivity at the hands of pro-Russian separatists. 
  • The young survivors of the 2004 Beslan school hostage crisis move ahead with their lives, documented by photographer Oksana Yushko.
  • New inquests have been ordered into the deaths of two Belfast civilians shot by security forces in 1972.
  • AFP editors talk about the experience and process of sifting through graphic photographs from war zones. 
  • The September update on US drone strikes in Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia.
  • A federal judge denied the Department of Justice’s request to close the Guantánamo Bay force feeding hearings, a request she called “deeply troubling.”
  • VICE interviews Guantánamo’s new commander, Rear Adm. Kyle Cozad.
  • Terrorism charges against former Guantánamo inmate Moazzem Begg fell apart, resulting in a not guilty verdict and setting him free from Belmarsh prison.

Photo: Syrian Kurds on the border between Turkey and Syria just after mortars hit on both sides. Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty.