A separate thought...

Politics, Feminism, quotes, books, films, tv shows, music and some ramblings.

To be white, or straight, or male, or middle class is to be simultaneously ubiquitious and invisible. You’re everywhere you look, you’re the standard against which everyone else is measured. You’re like water, like air. People will tell you they went to see a “woman doctor” or they will say they went to see “the doctor.” People will tell you they have a “gay colleague” or they’ll tell you about a colleague. A white person will be happy to tell you about a “Black friend,” but when that same person simply mentions a “friend,” everyone will assume the person is white. Any college course that doesn’t have the word “woman” or “gay” or “minority” in its title is a course about men, heterosexuals, and white people. But we call those courses “literature,” “history” or “political science.”

This invisibility is political.

—Michael S. Kimmel, in the introduction to the book, “Privilege: A Reader”  (via rosaparking)

(Source: thinkspeakstress, via femblr)

What's happening in Hong Kong?

fireinthehob:

  • The protests are being held in order to achieve universal suffrage in Hong Kong. Although democracy had been promised for 2017 in 2008, China announced this August that Hong Kong people would only be able to vote from a pool of 2-3 specially selected candidates (all of whom…
scienceyoucanlove:

Great women of science Rosalind Franklin (1920-1958) - British biophysicist and X-ray crystallographer who made critical contributions to the understanding of the fine molecular structures of DNA, RNA, viruses, coal, and graphite. Marie Skłodowska-Curie (1867-1934) - Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist, famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity. Chien-Shiung Wu (1912-1997) - Chinese American physicist with expertise in the techniques of experimental physics and radioactivity. Émilie du Châtelet (1706-1749) - French mathematician, physicist, and author during the Age of Enlightenment.Mae Jemison (1956) - American physician and NASA astronaut. She became the first African American woman to travel in space when she went into orbit aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on September 12, 1992.Vera Rubin (1928) - American astronomer who pioneered work on galaxy rotation rates. She is famous for uncovering the discrepancy between the predicted angular motion of galaxies and the observed motion, by studying galactic rotation curves. Ada Lovelace (1815-1852) - English mathematician and writer chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage’s early mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. Her notes on the engine include what is recognised as the first algorithm intended to be processed by a machine. Because of this, she is often described as the world’s first computer programmer.
read more

scienceyoucanlove:

Great women of science 

Rosalind Franklin (1920-1958) - British biophysicist and X-ray crystallographer who made critical contributions to the understanding of the fine molecular structures of DNA, RNA, viruses, coal, and graphite. 

Marie Skłodowska-Curie (1867-1934) - Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist, famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity. 

Chien-Shiung Wu (1912-1997) - Chinese American physicist with expertise in the techniques of experimental physics and radioactivity. 

Émilie du Châtelet (1706-1749) - French mathematician, physicist, and author during the Age of Enlightenment.

Mae Jemison (1956) - American physician and NASA astronaut. She became the first African American woman to travel in space when she went into orbit aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on September 12, 1992.

Vera Rubin (1928) - American astronomer who pioneered work on galaxy rotation rates. She is famous for uncovering the discrepancy between the predicted angular motion of galaxies and the observed motion, by studying galactic rotation curves. 

Ada Lovelace (1815-1852) - English mathematician and writer chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage’s early mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. Her notes on the engine include what is recognised as the first algorithm intended to be processed by a machine. Because of this, she is often described as the world’s first computer programmer.

read more

(via femblr)

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.
The ICC will probe possible war crimes in the Central African Republic.
Fighters in Nigeria’s Boko Haram drive fear in neighboring Cameroon.
The number of refugees fleeing violence in South Sudan nears 2 million.
French mountaineering guide Herve Gourdel was beheaded by Jund al-Khilafah, an Algerian extremist group who has aligned themselves with ISIS.
The Syrian army has overrun the town of Adra al-Omalia, about 30km from Damascus.
A great visual guide to ongoing strikes in Iraq and Syria. 
The British debate joining the airstrikes.
The Al-Nusra Front leader Abu Yousef al-Turki was reportedly killed in strikes.
International law and strikes inside Syria - from Just Security.
The UAE’s bombing mission against ISIS targets was led by its first female fighter pilot, Mariam al-Mansouri. Fox News correspondents later joked that she represented “boobs on the ground”* and that she had probably been unable to park her jet. 
A newly-discussed terrorist element, Khorasan, appeared in the news this week. Khorasan is often misleadingly characterized in reports as a separate terrorist group, but this AP report is a really comprehensive explanation of who these people are.
The White House has said that any ISIS prisoners captured will not end up in Guantánamo.
The main theme of President Obama’s speech at the UN this week was ISIS and the plans to combat them.
The US believes about 20 to 30 Americans are currently fighting in Syria. 
Sameera Salih Ali al-Nuaimy, an Iraqi lawyer who fought for women’s rights, was executed by an ISIS firing squad after several days of torture — another instance of the group’s targeting of professional women.
The IAEA rejected an Arab bid to push Israel to sign the global anti-nuclear weapons pact. 
Hamas and Fatah have reached an understanding that paves the way for a unity government.
Radical cleric Abu Qatada was acquitted of terrorism charges in a Jordanian court.
The US has ordered some diplomats out of Yemen. Is the country on the brink of civil war?
Adam Baron on the myth of the “Yemen model” of counterterrorism.
Ashraf Ghani is now officially Afghanistan’s president-elect. 
Taliban insurgents in Afghanistan seized the Ajrestan district of Ghazni province Thursday night, killing 70 people.
A suspected drone strike killed 10 Uzbek and Pakistani militants near the border with Afghanistan on Wednesday. 
Photographer Massimo Berruti documents the injuries and traumas of victims of drone strikes.
The US transferred 14 Pakistani prisoners from military detention to Pakistani custody.
Human Rights Watch calls out abuses of political prisoners in Uzbekistan.
50 people were reported killed in Xinjiang last Sunday in what Chinese police are calling an act of terrorism.
The US is preparing to ease the Vietnam arms embargo.
Pro-Ukrainian residents remaining in the east live in a world of intense scrutiny and propaganda.
Latvia fears Kremlin aggression.
Hungary suspended gas supplies to Ukraine.
The Treasury Dept named 12 Specially Designated Global Terrorists.
Interpol is expanding its foreign fighters database.
The FBI has identified the killer responsible for the beheadings of James Foley, Steven Sotloff and David Haines, but is not revealing that information to the public.
The US is undergoing a major atomic renewal, an overhaul and update of its nuclear weapons systems (despite previous ideas floated about disarmament).
The Boston bombing trial of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has been delayed two months. 
Elliott Ackerman wrote a beautiful essay for The New Yorker about the two photos marking a beginning and a kind of end for his war.
*As well as being sexists, Fox correspondents also apparently do not have the greatest grasp of the difference between aerial bombing and ground warfare.
Photo: Suruc, Turkey. Syrian Kurd refugees gather at the Syrian-Turkish border. Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.

  • The ICC will probe possible war crimes in the Central African Republic.
  • Fighters in Nigeria’s Boko Haram drive fear in neighboring Cameroon.
  • The number of refugees fleeing violence in South Sudan nears 2 million.
  • French mountaineering guide Herve Gourdel was beheaded by Jund al-Khilafah, an Algerian extremist group who has aligned themselves with ISIS.
  • The Syrian army has overrun the town of Adra al-Omalia, about 30km from Damascus.
  • A great visual guide to ongoing strikes in Iraq and Syria. 
  • The British debate joining the airstrikes.
  • The Al-Nusra Front leader Abu Yousef al-Turki was reportedly killed in strikes.
  • International law and strikes inside Syria - from Just Security.
  • The UAE’s bombing mission against ISIS targets was led by its first female fighter pilot, Mariam al-Mansouri. Fox News correspondents later joked that she represented “boobs on the ground”* and that she had probably been unable to park her jet. 
  • A newly-discussed terrorist element, Khorasan, appeared in the news this week. Khorasan is often misleadingly characterized in reports as a separate terrorist group, but this AP report is a really comprehensive explanation of who these people are.
  • The White House has said that any ISIS prisoners captured will not end up in Guantánamo.
  • The main theme of President Obama’s speech at the UN this week was ISIS and the plans to combat them.
  • The US believes about 20 to 30 Americans are currently fighting in Syria. 
  • Sameera Salih Ali al-Nuaimy, an Iraqi lawyer who fought for women’s rights, was executed by an ISIS firing squad after several days of torture — another instance of the group’s targeting of professional women.
  • The IAEA rejected an Arab bid to push Israel to sign the global anti-nuclear weapons pact. 
  • Hamas and Fatah have reached an understanding that paves the way for a unity government.
  • Radical cleric Abu Qatada was acquitted of terrorism charges in a Jordanian court.
  • The US has ordered some diplomats out of Yemen. Is the country on the brink of civil war?
  • Adam Baron on the myth of the “Yemen model” of counterterrorism.
  • Ashraf Ghani is now officially Afghanistan’s president-elect. 
  • Taliban insurgents in Afghanistan seized the Ajrestan district of Ghazni province Thursday night, killing 70 people.
  • A suspected drone strike killed 10 Uzbek and Pakistani militants near the border with Afghanistan on Wednesday. 
  • Photographer Massimo Berruti documents the injuries and traumas of victims of drone strikes.
  • The US transferred 14 Pakistani prisoners from military detention to Pakistani custody.
  • Human Rights Watch calls out abuses of political prisoners in Uzbekistan.
  • 50 people were reported killed in Xinjiang last Sunday in what Chinese police are calling an act of terrorism.
  • The US is preparing to ease the Vietnam arms embargo.
  • Pro-Ukrainian residents remaining in the east live in a world of intense scrutiny and propaganda.
  • Latvia fears Kremlin aggression.
  • Hungary suspended gas supplies to Ukraine.
  • The Treasury Dept named 12 Specially Designated Global Terrorists.
  • Interpol is expanding its foreign fighters database.
  • The FBI has identified the killer responsible for the beheadings of James Foley, Steven Sotloff and David Haines, but is not revealing that information to the public.
  • The US is undergoing a major atomic renewal, an overhaul and update of its nuclear weapons systems (despite previous ideas floated about disarmament).
  • The Boston bombing trial of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has been delayed two months. 
  • Elliott Ackerman wrote a beautiful essay for The New Yorker about the two photos marking a beginning and a kind of end for his war.

*As well as being sexists, Fox correspondents also apparently do not have the greatest grasp of the difference between aerial bombing and ground warfare.

Photo: Suruc, Turkey. Syrian Kurd refugees gather at the Syrian-Turkish border. Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty

The Failures of Emma Watson's UN Speech

the-middle-eastern-feminist:

Let’s engage in a critical analysis of Emma Watson speech given at the UN to raise awareness of the HeforShe Campaign.

I want to start of by saying that I think it is WONDERFUL that her speech has gained so much support and love internationally; it is also so wonderful that her speech has…

This is a productive way to engage with Emma Watson’s speech and engagement, not leaking nude photos.

Hackers are trying to silence Emma Watson by leaking naked photos - but they only made her voice louder

I was away for the day and one of the first things I read after coming home was this article in the guardian. Yesterday, I shared Emma Watson’s speech at the UN to launch the he for she campaign, asking men to stand up for gender equality. And today, I have to read about how she was, shortly after, reduced to this nude photo or in other words a sexual object. This is exaclty what she was talking about in her speech (amongst other things. Go have a look at the video here) harassmend that women experience every day. Luckily though it backfired:

" The rage I felt looking at my Twitter feed last night began to dissipate when I saw the response to the Star’s headline: how loudly women and men mocked it, how much disgust was thrown at the hackers who claimed to have stolen these photos. And how much support Watson gained for her campaign. She’d asked men to stand with her against female inequality and it was happening live. Those people who had tried to silence her had just helped her, and every other woman who’s ever spoken out against injustice, to shout a little louder." (Quote form above linked article)

Find out about the he for she campaign here.

In one experiment, mothers were asked to guess the steepness of a carpeted slope that their 11-month olds would be able to crawl. Then the children actually crawled the slope, and the difference between actual and mother-predicted angles was noted.

The results showed that both boys and girls were able to crawl the same degree of incline. However, the predictions of the mothers were correct within one degree for the boys and underestimated their daughter’s ability by nine degrees.

What this shows is that the presumption that boys are more physical causes parents to encourage their boys more in physical activities while cautioning their girls. This further translates into providing more opportunities for boys to be physical and fewer for girls. The result?

Boys actually do develop stronger physical skills than girls. But not because of anything innate or biological, but rather because of the gender roles that the parents subconsciously projected onto their babies.

For the record, feminism, by definition, is the belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities. It is the theory of political, economic, and social equality of the sexes.

And if you still hate the word, it is not the word that is important. It’s the idea and ambition behind it.

How can we affect change in the world when only half of it is invited or feels welcome to participate in the conversation? Men, I would take this opportunity to extend your formal invitation. Gender equality is your issue too.

Emma Watson for HeForShe at the United Nations  (via femininefreak)

Very true! I totally agree with her and that is one reason why I explicitly try and to men about these issues as much as I possibly can.

Emma Watson’s speech at the UN for the heforshe campaign which advocates gender equality.

I think the speech was great and the issues she raised a very true and it is time to take action